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Cynical tales for desperate times... on through 15 September

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The Seasons of Trouble: Life Amid the Ruins of Sri Lanka's Civil War

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Toggle navigation MENU. Email Address. Mohan demonstrates an accessible, engaging method of relaying a difficult, violent history. Review Posted Online: Aug.

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Please provide an email address. Categories of Interest: Select All. In March , she considers fleeing to India, but turns back.


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In so doing she must tread very carefully. People with links to the separatist group, tangential or otherwise, face enormous challenges in Sri Lanka today — especially former members of the Tamil Tigers.

From intensive surveillance to arbitrary arrest and detention, to discrimination in the eyes of potential employers, to social exclusion, ex-combatants are constantly reminded that the war might be over, but their struggle is not. Critics may complain that the story is told almost exclusively from a Tamil perspective. Challenges that Muslims have faced are also mentioned, but still, there is merit to this critique.

The Seasons of Trouble: Life Amid the Ruins of Sri Lanka's Civil War - Rohini Mohan - Google книги

This is not to suggest that war and violent conflict are ordinary. As part of a recent U. Human Rights Council resolution , the third which has been passed on Sri Lanka in as many years, the U. Yet, in terms of international scrutiny of the Rajapaksa regime, what happens next remains unclear.

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While they have been designed to promote human rights, reconciliation and accountability in Sri Lanka, the Human Rights Council resolutions on Sri Lanka have been largely ineffectual. The Seasons of Trouble ends on a prescient and sober note in April , as the author recounts an incident of anti-Muslim violence perpetrated by the violent extremist Sinhala Buddhist organization, the Bodu Bala Sena — a group that receives tacit support from the ruling regime.

As someone who spent several years working for a human rights organization in Sri Lanka, this book resonated deeply with me.

Indeed, disappearances, arbitrary arrest and detention, torture, sexual and ethnic violence, discrimination, land problems, militarization, a lack of media freedom and widespread impunity for crimes committed are all issues which reverberate throughout post-war Sri Lanka.

The Rajapaksa regime consistently mentions that economic growth and infrastructure development since the conclusion of war has been extensive; this is true. However, due to corruption, nepotism, the shrinking space for civil society, and questionable macroeconomic policies, ordinary Sinhalese have suffered too.